Please Concentrate, Sir

Not the way to manage but he does such a fine job!

Sure… Any game can feel challenging, especially when not paying attention. Last time, I sneered at the seemingly sudden difficulty spike of Nights of Azure without considering Arnice’s demon sword. After a bit of slipshod grinding, it had already reached a whole new level. For quite some time, I thought it merely got automatically stronger but it actually took an innocent press of a d-pad button to unleash its true potential. Oh well, no biggie; once this trusty demon hunter utensil turned twice as long and powerful as its wielder, that once-bothersome extra boss swiftly got what was coming. So did the one that followed, as well as all the familiar acquaintances from the first run. All this was rewarded with an ending quite a bit more pleasant than the first one, so I can finally consider the game beat in good conscience.

Or maybe not quite, as I’m still hesitating whether to do a bit of cleaning up by going for all of the game’s trophies or not. Sadly, when it comes to those, Nights of Azure is rather unimaginative. I’m mostly left with a bunch of “do X of this” baits that, at this point in the game, only raise questions of why they’re still even there. Arena trophies might go in the same wastebasket as well. There are a few dozen challenges that pit Arnice and her Servans against slightly puzzle-esque scenarios with time limits. In a way, I suppose they demonstrate the designer’s perception of how the game was meant to be approached from the very beginning but as I’m already pretty much done with everything, such lessons in strategy no longer hold any value whatsoever.

Given how positive I’ve been about Nights of Azure in general (well, it really is rather good!), I feel almost obliged to whine a wee bit more. First, it certainly isn’t much of a looker, even if that’s probably more due to awkward timing and a small budget. The game was released as-is on PS3, PS4, and Vita, so even those of us on PS4 won’t witness any additional graphical fireworks. Still, that’s a minor niggle in comparison to the sorriest localization effort ever. The translated script is chock-full of typos and missing words, and while Arnice is Arnice in the game, she’s Anders in the trophy descriptions, and apparently Aluche in the sequel that is just a few weeks away by now. Seriously, come on!

That’s all the naysay I can think of, though, as I’ll forever remember Nights of Azure as a game that was pleasant in length, pleasant in humor, and pleasant in being a bit of an odd bird. Sure, it might be pure B-class but at least it’s B-class that works!

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