Joy Is Optional

As one might surmise, this Sunday has been all about Ni no Kuni II: Revenant Kingdom as well. Evan & Co. have already allied themselves with all the other world nations, which naturally acts as a cue for the main bad guy to stop skulking in the shadows and get on with the end of the world. Preparing for that gives me just enough time to hunt down an ancient magical sword which most likely allows me to give him a thorough royal beating… Or scratching, given Evan’s feline nature. I’m still only 29 hours in, so for a JRPG the story seems not just a little tired but surprisingly short, too. That’s hardly an issue, though, as the game is remarkably generous in its side content.

The most entertaining aspect of this adventure is turning out to be Evan’s new kingdom, Evermore. It’s a place that the player can develop ever further, limited mostly by the slowly regenerating funds of its national treasury. Tax revenue can be used to build, enhance, and fund dozens of miscellaneous establishments for which there are 103 motivated individuals to recruit. These places provide not just weapons, armor, spells, accessories, health items, and battle food, but also a huge array of resources used for trade and as ingredients for ever-better gear. The layout of Evermore is predetermined, so there’s hardly any creativity involved in building the kingdom but even simple managing like this has proven out to be surprisingly entertaining. Once the nation’s coffers are empty, it’s just a matter of waiting for them to refill by continuing the main story or exploring the game world in over 150 side missions.

As well as trying to create the most awesome kingdom ever, the world features 50 tainted (read: extra tough) monsters to beat, as well as an equal number of Higgledies to be found; cute little elementals that randomly help the player in battles with their special powers. As my inner completionist is very much looking forward to accomplish all this, the game certainly compensates its seemingly weak story rather amicably. Besides, should there ever be a moment of nothing to do, there are always randomly generated mini quests that reward the player with tokens that can be exchanged for useful resources or hints on finding new recruits to Evermore.

Ni no Kuni II is particularly considerate with its exemplary resource management. If any side quest or a piece of gear to be enhanced requires any ingredients whatsoever, the game is polite enough to tell where the needed items can be bought or found. Most RPGs force their players to wander around aimlessly for hours or consult the internet, but for once these obligatory loot mechanics have been implemented like they should! I’m also quite taken by the ability to save pretty much anywhere. There are traditional save points, too, good for restoring all HP and MP, but it’s still a most welcome bonus to be able to end a game session whenever you feel like it.

Granted, the generous amount of side content sounds impressive only by numbers. Everything can turn remarkably repetitious and the swiftly rising challenge level of the main story more or less forces the player to spend time with said content. Still, today Ni no Kuni II didn’t feel nearly as much of a disappointment as it did yesterday. While it’s hardly on par with its predecessor, it still has plenty of good things going for it.

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