Category Archives: YouTube

Redemption

That… Didn’t go well.

And thus comes Final Fantasy Type-0 HD to its end. The large-scale conflict eventually reached a proper conclusion, even if the game still managed to introduce a totally surprising finale that, sadly, wasn’t entirely bereft of awkward cliches. In the end, it managed to answer as many questions as it left others ambiguous. No can do; the workings of this universe have been given way more attention than coming up with a coherent story. The action-packed missions don’t jive very well with the slightly aimless free time parts, and even if there are cinematics, many of them are often too short or just plain irrelevant. I suppose I could follow my (hurried) 25-hour playthrough with another go in order to get a better overall picture, but hunting down little morsels of information to reconstruct in one’s own head isn’t really that alluring.

That’s not to say Type-0 wouldn’t have its fair share of memorable moments. The soundtrack by Takeharu Ishimoto, in particular, is perhaps the grandest and most impressive in the history of the entire franchise. Orchestral scores backed up by a big mixed choir blare with incredible intensity, evoking genuine affection. Of course, there are also more tranquil tunes. Especially when the one linked above starts to play with your team in the middle of the battlefield following their orders while other units relay their final moments over the radio is still something that brings a lump in my throat. Heart-wrenchingly beautiful!

Thanks to a bittersweet epilogue, I even slightly miss my own crew, even if forming an actual emotional bond with any of them would have required a lot more interaction and character development. As they stand, the cadets are more or less just a group of fighters from among whom you probably choose to prefer the ones suiting your playstyle. Sure, the game is an action-JRPG, but it kind of feels like too much emphasis is on action.

Despite everything, Type-0 doesn’t shy away from blood, violence, and the madness of war, and therefore manages to leave a stark impression. Such elements are hardly essential but were they used in a “proper” Final Fantasy (read: games VII-IX), it might be one heck of a ride. Type-0 is certainly worth playing through but while it has many good particulars, it fails to make everything work in unison.

E-Threesome

Either I need a vacation or I’m just getting old (or most likely a bit of both) but this year’s E3 galloped past without leaving much of an impression. For the first time in years, I skipped the live press conferences of the Big Three and didn’t even bother to watch them afterwards. Even if that was a subconscious decision, the overall feedback seems to support it; the traditional big companies showed off their traditional big stuff, and their showpieces seemed vaguely nice but not really anything more than that.

Still, digging around the outskirts of the big budget AAA swamp wasn’t a complete waste of time, given that E3 was still courteous enough to provide something for us pathetic hipster farts, too. First, there was Ni no Kuni II: Revenant Kingdom which finally got a solid release November release date. I’m not particularly thrilled that the children of the first game got replaced with teen protagonists but since Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch, back in its day, was one pretty damn solid JRPG, I’m pre-ordering its sequel the very second it becomes available. The dub in the trailer isn’t particularly impressive but here’s hoping the original audio will be included.

The second place of this year’s E3 goes to Life Is Strange: Before the Storm. The first Life Is Strange readily challenged (the sometimes equally impressive) Telltale for the crown of emotion- and story-driven adventures, and if there’s more to be experienced then I’m first in the line. Sure, it’s still an episodic adventure split into three parts, so I’ll wait until they’re all out and dressed into a physical form but I’m very much in the line nonetheless. Before the Storm kicks off at the end of August this year, so with a bit of luck it’s going to be one awfully wonderful journey by early 2018.

For now, 13 Sentinels: Aegis Rim doesn’t even have a western release date (not even a Japanese one for that matter) but since its trailer has been localized, we’ll probably get to enjoy this Vanillaware latest eventually. Seems like yet another harrowingly beautiful 2D action-adventure but as it’s a recipe that has worked before, I have no qualms supporting it further.

Inis Is Back!

Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy, oh boy! Some of the younger people might not remember but back in the middle of the last decade, Inis was bad-ass! Their Nintendo DS games Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan, Moero! Nekketsu Rhythm Damashii Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan 2, and the western adaptation of those two, Elite Beat Agents, represented the best and funniest rhythm gaming out there. After these gems, the firm ended up developing notably less interesting karaoke games for the Xbox 360, after which they went mobile. In my heart, I had already bid this once brilliant studio my sad farewell, but now it looks like they’re ready to make one hell of a comeback!

Inis has joined hands with the equally forgotten NanaOn-Sha, who are probably best known for PaRappa the Rapper, the game considered to be the first ever modern rhythm game. I’m still baffled as to why that silly game, lasting only an hour or two, enjoys such a fame as it seemingly does, especially now with a HD remake out and everything. Still, I’ll admit it was pretty neat despite its short length. Whatever the case, these two cult studios are now working on Project Rap Rabbit. At this point, all we know about it is the above teaser video and a Kickstarter page that promises a 2018 story-driven rhythm game for PC and PS4, should the funding be met. I sure hope it does, as I’m actually a little bit surprised how developers of such caliber even need to resort to Kickstarter in the first place.

…and if anyone was left wondering about all this weird Inis worship then come on, surely these were the best rhythm times ever:

Two Note Wonder

So adorable in stills, so brutal in motion

After an additional five hours or so, I’ve completed all songs of Taiko no Tatsujin: Dokodon! Mystery Adventure on Normal. 59 of them with a full combo, 11 others in a less-stellar fashion. There might still be a few more hidden songs but I think I’ll let them remain hidden. The song selection was, once again, a delightful mixture of all sorts of stuff, even if nothing was exceptionally memorable. As for game songs, the Kirby and Ace Attorney medleys were nice, and some of the Namco original tracks were just as silly as they were awesome. The jpop and anime picks, however, came off surprisingly generic. Then again, we all have our own taste in music, so the game still deserves praise for its diversity.

On whole, Dokodon! Mystery Adventure is probably just as comfy and familiar to hardcore fans of the series as it remains slightly more unconventional for the rest of us. The video above sums it up quite nicely. If you truly want to excel in Taiko games, you need A) a flat surface, B) willingness to embrace the touch screen , C) two styluses, and D) the soul of a drummer. If you prefer the casual, traditional way of holding the console in your hands and using your thumbs and index fingers to hit the notes, it’s a perfectly viable style on Easy and Normal but not so much on the two harder difficulties. The series is simply designed to be experienced in a way that is eventually way too fast for finger reflexes alone.

That’s actually both the main strength and weakness of the whole series. Taiko games require a unique playstyle. Eventually mastering it is probably highly rewarding but unless you dream of becoming a drummer, or are willing to dedicate your life to master a single series, it’s not even remotely as exciting. Each to their own, of course, but I still prefer an everyday eight button Hatsune Miku experience to pure two note divinity, even if the latter is bloody impressive when showcased by a skilled professional. As such, this is a game that can easily provide hundreds of hours of entertainment but it’s also a game that can be experienced in a jiffy, still appreciating its songs, replaying at least some of them just because they’re fun, and finding nothing genuinely wrong with the gameplay, either. For the sake of diversity, though, I’ll now take my 17 hours and, having once again satisfied my hunger for rhythm, rush towards new experiences.

Hooray for physical!

The game flood of early 2017 is starting to recede but while I was busy with one, two others still managed to sneak their way in. Of those, The Silver Case is a remake of a PS1 adventure from 1999. The reason for its comeback is undoubtedly its delightfully strange writer and designer, Goichi Suda. The Silver Case was his debut into the gaming industry, so it’s rather interesting to see just how eccentric it is. If I had to wager, I’d say extremely. The other game, Stardew Valley, is more or less about a single person as well. Eric Barone developed this Harvest Moon -esque agriculture RPG all by himself, and it has received nothing but praise from multiple sources. Since it was finally deemed worthy of a physical release, too, I’m definitely excited to give it a go.

Tokyo on My Mind

One more month of agonizing waiting and we finally get to enjoy Persona 5! Regarding the game, I’ve deliberately kept myself in the dark as much as possible but what the heck, one fast-paced trailer won’t hurt. I didn’t get into this outstanding and highly creative demon slaying / everyday high school life JRPG series until last year (!) on Vita but on that one, Persona 4 Golden instantly became one of my most beloved games ever. Compared to that, Persona 5 seems very much the same (even including the main characters) but with even more style. One of the only minor flaws in the fourth game was its forced dub, which ate away some of the ambience of such a deeply Japanese experience. The fifth game, however, also features original audio so come April 4th, it might provide an even more authentic virtual Tokyo than Yakuza 0!

Speaking of Tokyo, Spike Chunsoft announced some interesting news this week. Even if it’s not until spring next year, PS4 will be getting a localized version of 428: Shibuya Scramble. It’s some sort of peculiar visual novel that combines text, anime, and live action video clips. In Japan, the game was released on Wii in 2008 and on PS3/PSP in 2009. That’s pretty much all I know but since Spike Chunsoft is a true professional of the genre and since Famitsu awarded the original game a perfect 40/40 score, I’m most certainly picking it up come 2018. It’s delightful to see how even Japanese niche releases are slowly but surely finding a market here in the west, too!

Cat Girl Invasion

Well, I’ll be! The gaming year 2017 has barely kicked off and there’s already good news for antromo… antropomop… antporomorp… furry fans. Come spring, there’s at least two releases to twitch an ear to, so this innately Japanese entertainment tradition seems very much alive and well. Which is good, because cats are always awesome.

Atlus has already confirmed a western release for both Utawarerumono: Mask of Deception and Utawarerumono: Mask of Truth. The first-mentioned will be out some time this spring while the latter is scheduled for fall. It’s apparently some sort of a two-part saga that touts itself as an VN/SRPG hybrid. So, plenty of story-driven reading coupled with isometric, turn-based tactical combat? I’m sold! The games will be released on both PS4 and Vita, and while Europe can only look forward to paltry digital releases, it’s still an option to import physical copies from across the pond instead. The games will even sport original audio with English subtitles, so my mouse cursor is already hovering over an imaginary “Add to Cart” button.

Meanwhile, Koei Tecmo still relies on a 20-year-old recipe of totally OP heroes effortlessly hacking and slashing their way through thousands of enemies. Musou Stars, also a PS4/Vita release, will most likely be just as uninspired as the dozens of games preceding it, but at least its cast looks like proper fan service. Instead of crabby Chinese legends, the game features playable characters from a number of other games and series, including Atelier, Dead or Alive, Toukiden, and even the Wii oddball Opoona! The cat girl on the video, Tamaki, is an original. I think it’s quite safe to say this won’t be even near to any kind of game of the year nomination but for such a silly potpourri, I’ll gladly take it for a spin. Musou Stars will be out in Japan on March 2, but considering how many games from the studio have seen daylight in the west before, a local release date should be just a matter of time.