Tag Archives: Ray Gigant

Tokyo Mended, All Is Well

Taking a break from saving the world

Gigants have been bested not just in Tokyo but around the world as well. As it turned out, Ray Gigant wasn’t just an Ichiya Amakaze parade. As the story progressed, a couple of other Yorigami adopters were eventually located in England and the Caribbean. I kind of wish they weren’t, though, as the heroes were a remarkably dysfunctional bunch of people. The trio of a dunce, a psychopath, and a bimbo only interacted by bickering, ragging, and wallowing in self-pity, on top of which they all had a nearly identical story segment. After slaying a few Gigants, everything starts to go horribly wrong and someone dies. As the characters are repulsive and hardly ever get along, there’s very little drama even the first time around, let alone third.

Things didn’t get much better with dungeon crawling. The initial uncluttered mazes were eventually replaced with a jumble of hidden walls, teleports, and pits all aimed to make progress as arduous as possible. Since there are no random encounters, it’s still fairly swift to get through everything, and Ray Gigant is not nearly as sadistic as many other games in the genre (cough, Dungeon Travelers 2, cough). Still, dungeon design especially towards the end is as unenthusiastic as it comes. The game does feature a handy auto-pilot that enables you to quickly move to a map square visited before but even that gets so confused by teleports and conveyor belts that it eventually turns useless.

Fighting is the only part Ray Gigant almost gets right. The bigger the Gigants, the more awesome they look, and even if the game is relatively easy, slowly chipping away bosses’ massive health meters is always at least a little bit suspenseful. The final boss, though, was cheap beyond belief. About halfway into the fight, it put up such ridiculously heavy defenses that almost nothing seemed to work. In the end, I had to repeat the same boring move macro for almost an hour with even the biggest special attacks dealing only a paltry amount of damage. Even if he fell in the end, it was a dreary battle of attrition.

Thankfully Ray Gigant at least knows how to be moderate. Unlike most JRPGs, the whole adventure took only about 25 hours, and for the most part there were so many good bosses that the overall experience was at least slightly above average. Sure, its story is pointless drivel and there’s no character chemistry whatsoever, but at least everything moves at a brisk pace. On whole, the game is a passable light version of dungeon crawling. It doesn’t come even close to the undisputed (not negotiable) king of the genre, Demon Gaze, but it’s still a decent effort, especially for a lowly budget release. If nothing else, at least its brittle shell hides some neat and original ideas.

Aww… Tokyo Broke Again

Yup… I’d classify that one as big.

So much for the gaming slump, thanks to Experience’s jolly little dungeon crawling JRPG Ray Gigant, even if its premise is hardly original. Tokyo is in ruins once more when aliens known as Gigants suddenly emerge, treating Earth as their personal pantry. The army is quickly annihilated but hey, that’s why there are teenagers! Ichiya Amakaze comes across a mysterious talking talisman, Yorigami, which provides him enough power to take down even a Gigant as large as a high-rise. Much to the chagrin of this reluctant youngster, this power is also a one-way ticket to a secret academy whose students are the final hope to repel the invasion.

Even if the story seems to be as tired as they come, Ray Gigant is still a quirky little title. In a party of three, the players is sent to crawl through grid-based dungeons in first perspective view. There, the youths slays plenty of grunt-level Gigants while working their way to the end to take on a much tougher mid-boss. It’s not until that one is bested that the crew scores a marker that can be used to lure out and kill one of the first-class Gigants that tower dozens of feet in height. Rinse and repeat while Amakaze’s chaperones do their best to figure out how to get rid of the baddies for good.

The biggest asset of Ray Gigant is probably its eccentric battle system. It is based on a pool of a hundred action points shared by all party members. Everyone gets a turn and can execute up to five actions during it. Of course, every action has a price tag, so going mental is only good for exhausting the pool within a single round. Points can be slowly restored either by using an entire turn waiting, or winning the skirmish as fast as possible. Since the game keeps track of the latest moves selected, clever players quickly come up with a handy macro that is good for most occasions. All hit points are automatically restored after each fight, and as there are even an indefinite amount of healing items, you might wonder if such a system has any chance to work in practice.

Challenge stems from having to mind opponents’ strengths and weaknesses in a rock-paper-scissors kind of style, but especially from Parasitism. This nasty disease, carried over between fights, hits after every ten rounds and forces the party into a state where moves cost hit points rather than action points, and that cost is mighty severe. The illness can be surpassed simply by winning the fight in which it occurs, but it can be especially catastrophic during the massive and lengthy boss fights. Thankfully there’s also a power meter that rises ever so slowly in every encounter. If it is even half full, Parasitism can be subdued with a proper harakiri. That’s when Amakaze slices his guts, awakens the full power of his Yorigami, and unleashes an absolutely brutal combo upon his hapless opponents. Its strength is determined by a rhythmical mini-game, so the battle briefly turns into an anime music video during which the player tries to hit as many notes as possible. More hits, more damage. Genuinely neat!

For a dungeon crawler, Ray Gigant is extremely forgiving. There aren’t even any random encounters. At the beginning of every dungeon, Amakaze’s talisman politely analyzes the location of every enemy and treasure on the floor. Even if the actual maps aren’t filled in until moving about, it’s nice to have at least a vague impression of what lies where. The dungeons feature the usual assortment of traps, hidden doors, and teleport panels, but the game doesn’t seem to get overly sadistic with them. Making progress is always a breeze, so the game is perhaps the most suitable title for newcomers interested in the genre.

Still, despite plenty of fun little ideas, the game also stumbles a lot. It’s an ongoing journey but perhaps by the next entry I can construe a solid understanding on why Ray Gigant is likely not much more than “pretty okay.”

I Am So Smart! S-M-R-T!

I can’t help but starting to feel that Picross 3D isn’t merely a second-stringer to be played when nothing else of importance is around. Whenever I decide to quickly solve a puzzle or maybe two, I suddenly find myself realizing how time has simply flown by. I’m no longer inclined to guess, and even if those initially oh-so-generous time limits suddenly feel uncomfortably strict, making me either go under or over them by a minute or two, the game is a logic rush like none other! After a whopping 24 hours, I’ve finally completed all Beginner and Easy challenges with three stars. Merely solving a puzzle is worth one, which is good enough to make progress, but the extra stars for not making any mistakes and staying within the time limit have – at least so far – been far to tempting to skip.

At this point, the game’s most rewarding feature is its pacing. I began with “heh, this is laughably simple” only to quickly run into “oh dear Lord, is this even solvable” and eventually “hoo boy, this sure takes time to solve.” Every now and then that one single cube needed to proceed does a stellar job hiding out of sight but on whole, relentless practice truly does make perfect. The geometry of any puzzle still occasionally allures me to mark and remove cubes that are right “for sure” but such seduction no longer works; I’m now all about numbers and logical deduction. The time limit is still nothing more than a needlessly stressful feature that mostly leads to stupid mistakes and a quick restart. Then again, the frequency of those mistakes seems to dwindle as I go, so perhaps such a virtual whip has a well-intentioned purpose after all. Then again, the 3DS sequel purportedly does away with time limits altogether, and it sounds like the best overhaul ever.

Whatever the case, I’m now totally into Picross 3D. After 144 puzzles solved, I’m (slightly worriedly) off to tackle the ones under the Normal category. This won’t end well.

In the meantime, the last few acquisitions of the first half of the year have finally arrived to wait for their turn to shine come summer vacation (or perhaps retirement) days. Despite all the snide remarks that PlayStation Vita is dead, it’s still very much alive and well, the dungeon crawler slash visual novel (?) Ray Gigant serving as exhibit A and the ecchi shooter (?) Gun Gun Pixies as exhibit B. Obscure Japanese oddities, of course, might not even count in the first place but after all these years, I’ve still managed to end up with slightly more Vita games than 3DS games. The difference is negligible, though, so as far as handheld console gaming goes, it’s definitely a case of either or – preferably – both.